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"It is really great to discover that there are some gems in the industry with great ethics who can guide you and give you great advice. Thanks Justin for your blogs and time with me".

Photo Credit: thehareandparsnip Flickr via Compfight cc

If you read newspapers, you’re aware that the financial advice industry struggles to manage conflicts caused by ownership, targets and remuneration. Accountants, as a profession, have generally managed to avoid these conflicts by not providing financial advice to their clients. Instead, accountants refer clients to specialist advisers and mortgage brokers.

It seems like a good strategy. Is it really?

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Mortgage Bait and Switch

Did you negotiate a cheap mortgage and then wonder: what’s stopping my lender increasing the interest rate straight away?

Well, there’s nothing. And they do. Slowly.

Ever notice your lender offering new customers a cheaper interest rate than yours?

Well, that’s no accident.

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Justin Brand

Every week I’m asked:

How do I check if my investment advisor has given me good advice?

My answer:

How is your investment portfolio performing against the index (or average) of the markets in which you are invested?

And in my experience, the majority of people I ask tell me that they don’t know.

There are other factors that determine good investment advice besides performance. But it surprises me how many intelligent people don’t think to check the performance of their portfolio against the average market return. Especially when they’re paying an advisor a fee for investment advice.

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The Importance of an Investment Philosophy

An advisor without an investment philosophy is like a boat without a rudder.

If your advisor doesn’t have a convincing, evidence-based set of beliefs about the markets and how to invest in them, then you risk drifting from one idea to another.

An inconsistent investment approach is a common cause of capital loss.

An investment philosophy should inform an advisor’s decisions about your portfolio, so it’s important you not only understand and agree with their values and ideals, but that you can see evidence of a logical basis for making decisions about your wealth.

If your advisor recommends an investment strategy that doesn’t fit your values or view of the world – and that bothers you – then it’s not the right strategy for you.

My investment philosophy follows:

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Photo Credit: caseygoodness via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: caseygoodness

There are biases that affect the quality of advice we get every day of our lives. And not just financial advice.

When a real estate agent shows you houses for sale, they are working for the seller, not you. This affects which properties you are shown and your ability to negotiate the best price.

(This is why buyer’s advocates have become popular. As you are paying them to find your ideal property, your advocate’s interests are aligned with yours.)

In assessing the quality of any advice, it’s worth considering which party the seller is working for: you or the owner of the product.

There are other more subtle influences on the advice we get. While the medical profession manages potential conflicts by operating under a professional code of conduct, your GP may be influenced to prescribe some brands over others, due to a relationship with the pharmaceutical company (this could be done unconsciously…see below).

 

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Get mortgage free and own your home faster

Get mortgage free and own your home faster

Bad decisions on a $400,000 home loan can easily cost you $100,000.

If you already have a mortgage, it’s not too late to fix old mistakes (or avoid making them with your next loan).

You should review your mortgage every 2 years anyway.

Why? Because less income needed to payout your mortgage means more money for other areas of your life. Your mortgage is probably the biggest financial commitment you will make in life. It is easy to get right and just as easy to get completely wrong.

Most people are surprised to find out that a low interest rate is not the most significant factor in reducing mortgage cost and paying out a loan faster.

You won’t see lenders advertising most of the tactics available to you, as it’s not in their best interests – the longer it takes to payout your loan, the more money they make. Lenders make money by lending you as much as possible, for as long as possible and with fees as high as they can get away with.

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Photo: James Alcock (http://www.smh.com.au/business/cba-chief-ian-narev-on-notice-over-compensation)

Photo: James Alcock (http://www.smh.com.au/business/cba-chief-ian-narev-on-notice-over-compensation)

On 3 July 2014, Ian Narev, the Chief Executive Officer for Commonwealth Bank, addressed a press conference to respond to the Senate Inquiry’s report on CBA financial planning scandal.  The scathing report was issued on 26 June 2014 after months of investigation and relentless coverage so the fact that it took a week for CBA to respond is, in itself, telling.

Click here to access the Senate report. And for a high level review of the more interesting aspectsread “Wading in the shallows: Advice, ASIC and Accountability”.

Mr Narev provided a superficial and perhaps unconvincing response to the report and at the heart of the CBA’s considered response was his proposal to commence a CBA-run review of all financial advice provided by CFP and Financial Wisdom over a 10-year period.

The public and media response to this proposal has been other than what Mr Narev might have anticipated. Industry insiders and affected clients remain skeptical of CBAs ability to properly review their own advice.

And for good reason.

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Photo Credit: smiscandlon

Have you ever thought about how much you’re really paying for the advice you got from your financial planner? The direct costs are one part – and I think you should look at those closely to ensure you’re getting value – but take a look at the indirect costs.

Keeping costs down are a key to wealth – high costs put your future at risk.

Some of the most significant costs are hidden in your portfolio and are caused by product selection and your advisor’s bias towards actively managed funds.

Although most financial advisors recommend actively managed funds, in reality, the net return of active funds are consistently below most passive investments or index funds.

But apart from the underperformance and additional cost of active funds, there is another cost, which is often overlooked when investors compare active and passive (index) fund portfolios – a cost I’ll cover later in this post.

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